Zoe Wees takes “Control” of the charts with ultra-personal, ultra-relatable song

Svenja BlobelMusic can heal, and proof of that is the success that 18-year-old German singer Zoe Wees is having with her debut single “Control.”  While it’s specifically about Zoe’s experiences with childhood epilepsy, any fan who’s struggling with physical or mental issues can find comfort in the song’s message.

“Since the day I wrote ‘Control,’ I know that I’m not alone,” Zoe tells ABC Audio. “And I know that people are going through exactly the same struggles, or… [struggles] that feel relatable to the song.”

“Since the day I wrote ‘Control,’ I knew, ‘OK, this is a change,’ ’cause I can help so many people out there with my story,'” she continues. “And I’m so thankful that I got the chance, and that people hear my song…’cause it’s so important to me.”

The story of one particular fan has really stuck with her, Zoe says.

“She wrote me that her girlfriend passed away because of…epilepsy,” Zoe recalls. “And every time when she hears my song on the radio, she got the feeling that her girlfriend who passed away is thinking of her. And this is still in my head and this is so beautiful, and I’m so thankful.”

She adds, “So many people write me, ‘Thanks for the song, Zoe, now I can show my mom and tell her how I feel every day when I have the seizures.’ So that was my goal.”

The only thing left for Zoe to do now is to share her songs live with her fans.

“It’s still so sad that I can’t go on tour or do live stuff ’cause of COVID but I hopefully can do this next year,” she says. “I can’t wait to see everyone.”

Last month, Zoe opened for Sam Smith during his Abbey Road live stream.

By Andrea Dresdale
Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

By ABC Audio on November 12, 2020

Svenja BlobelMusic can heal, and proof of that is the success that 18-year-old German singer Zoe Wees is having with her debut single "Control."  While it's specifically about Zoe's experiences with childhood epilepsy, any fan who's struggling with physical or mental issues can find comfort in the song's message.

"Since the day I wrote 'Control,' I know that I'm not alone," Zoe tells ABC Audio. "And I know that people are going through exactly the same struggles, or... [struggles] that feel relatable to the song."

"Since the day I wrote 'Control,' I knew, 'OK, this is a change,' 'cause I can help so many people out there with my story,'" she continues. "And I'm so thankful that I got the chance, and that people hear my song...'cause it's so important to me."

The story of one particular fan has really stuck with her, Zoe says.

"She wrote me that her girlfriend passed away because of...epilepsy," Zoe recalls. "And every time when she hears my song on the radio, she got the feeling that her girlfriend who passed away is thinking of her. And this is still in my head and this is so beautiful, and I'm so thankful."

She adds, "So many people write me, 'Thanks for the song, Zoe, now I can show my mom and tell her how I feel every day when I have the seizures.' So that was my goal."

The only thing left for Zoe to do now is to share her songs live with her fans.

"It's still so sad that I can't go on tour or do live stuff 'cause of COVID but I hopefully can do this next year," she says. "I can't wait to see everyone."

Last month, Zoe opened for Sam Smith during his Abbey Road live stream.

By Andrea Dresdale
Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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